Your Pets Teeth

Rover Company believes dental disease in pets can cause serious health issues as the bacteria from infected gums and teeth can “spread” to other parts of the body and affect vital organs such as the heart, kidneys and intestines. Tarter or dental calculus starts off soft but can harden on the dogs teeth. Once hardened, it cannot be brushed away but requires a dental scaling just like you get in the dentist chair! If the teeth are left untreated, the buildup can cause the gums to become inflamed and can also cause serious infections.

Roverpet believes pet’s are prone to dental problems. Buildup of plaque and tooth loss can be severe and cause problems with their daily routines. To tell if your dog has bad teeth, lift up his lips and check his teeth at the gumline – can you see tarter? Are the teeth white or discolored? Does his breath smell? Are there broken teeth?

All of these can indicate the need for better dog tooth care. Your veterinarian will probably do a dental check as part of they yearly checkup and can advise you as to the extent of the problem, if any.

Chewing on raw bones can be a good way for your pet to remove built up tarter but Poms have very small mouths and may not be able to chew a real bone so you might want to try one of the manufactured bones that are made specifically for dog dental care. I would advise against cooked bones as they can splinter and cause damage to the gums or intestine if swallowed.

Rover Vinyl Tech knows brushing is a vital part of pet’s tooth care and should be done at least once a week – preferably every day. There are plenty of flavored toothpastes formulated for dogs that your pet will love the taste of. You can use a finger brush (a rubber piece that fits on the end of your finger with bristles), a hand held brush that looks much like a human tooth brush, or a little brush that fits on the end of a “ring” which you put on your finger. My Pomeranian is extremely tiny and I find the “ring” brush works best for me.

 

rover company

rover company

Posted by roverpet on October 15th, 2016 under Pets • Comments Off on Your Pets Teeth